Living and Giving

How to Make Decisions – What\’s The Right Way?

Share This Post

“Do not repeat the tactics which have gained you one victory, but let your methods be regulated by the infinite variety of circumstances.”

– Sun Tzu

Chinese General, Chinese Military Strategist, 

Writer and Chinese Philosopher

\"\"

Life isn\’t stale.

It\’s your job to be listening to all points. That way… you will determine the right way to act. 

Sometimes it is with strength; sometimes with Love. 

Sometimes a different pathway up the hill, or a different conversation.  

Perhaps the solution is a 1-1 situation – or a group of 1000 supporters. 

\"\"

“Do not repeat the tactics which have gained you one victory, but let your methods be regulated by the infinite variety of circumstances.”

So be open to the \”infinite variety of circumstances.\” What are they telling you? What resources will you use?  

I can give an example, even in our day-to-day. For example, what if you are frustrated with your boss?  

\"\"

Are you going to storm his office?

Meditate?

Ignore it and kowtow…. you just stay silent.

Slink away.

State Buddhist verses.  

Tell your mom.

Tell his mom!

Speak reasonably to him.

Send him a kind email because this is the third time.

Speak peacefully to him.  

Ask his manager to be involved.  

\"\"

Well, that\’s a variety of responses, and you can\’t do the same one every time. You must listen to what is right at the moment and then…

 “Do not repeat the tactics which have gained you one victory, but let your methods be regulated by the infinite variety of circumstances.”

You can then listen to your mind and heart, and follow the right decision, for that specific instance, that specific time. Then you listen and do it again. 

That\’s what Life is made up of, following your heart and addressing each situation, with Listening, with Love.   

I am Listening With You,

\"\"

\"\"

Sun Tzu (l. c. 500 BCE) was a Chinese military strategist and general best known as the author of the work The Art of War, a treatise on military strategy (also known as The Thirteen Chapters). He was associated (formally or as an inspiration) with The School of the Military, one of the philosophical systems of the Hundred Schools of Thought of the Spring and Autumn Period (c. 772-476 BCE), which advocated military preparedness in maintaining peace and social order.

Sun Tzu\’s historicity is uncertain. The Han dynasty historian Sima Qian and other traditional Chinese historians placed him as a minister to King Helü of Wu and dated his lifetime to 544–496 BC. Modern scholars accepting his historicity place the extant text of The Art of War in the later Warring States period based on its style of composition and its descriptions of warfare. Traditional accounts state that the general\’s descendant Sun Bin wrote a treatise on military tactics, also titled The Art of War. Since Sun Wu and Sun Bin were referred to as Sun Tzu in classical Chinese texts, some historians believed them identical, prior to the rediscovery of Sun Bin\’s treatise in 1972.

Sun Tzu\’s work has been praised and employed in East Asian warfare since its composition. During the twentieth century, The Art of War grew in popularity and saw practical use in Western society as well. It continues to influence many competitive endeavours in the world, including culture, politics, business and sports, as well as modern warfare.

Bio Source: Wikipedia and Ancient.com; Image: Fig1. Photo by Gladson Xavier from Pexels, Fig2. Photo by James Wheeler from Pexels, Fig3. Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels, Fig4. Photo by Jack Moreh from Freerange, Bio Photo on Wikimedia Commons

TWITTER | FACEBOOK | LINKEDIN | INSTAGRAM | IMDB | WEBSITE | UNIVERSALGIVING