Living and Giving

The Classic Pamela Positive: How Close You Are To Success? -Thomas A. Edison

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\”Many of life\’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.\”

-Thomas A. Edison

 

That\’s a shocking statement. How close you are to success….

You can do it…

You could do it…

You are ascending the mountain…

 

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and you stop.

How close are you? Connect with your true, heart-deep motivation. Instead of focusing on blocks, frustration or being tired, you can focus on why you are doing what you do.

They Gave Up. They Didn’t Realize. They Were So Close! Success was just there….. all what Edison tells us.

So what will you do today? Give up or cross over? Give up or stand up? Give up or ascend? Continue on your pathway, and firmly but gently, success will lead you.

Thank you, dear Thomas Edison, as we know you failed thousands of times. Yet your success still shines in our lives today.

Don\’t Give Up, You Are So Close!

Pamela

 


Edison was born in 1847 in the canal town of Milan, Ohio. In 1859 Edison began working on a local branch of the Grand Trunk Railroad, selling newspapers, magazines, and candy. At one point he also conducted chemical experiments in a baggage-car laboratory.

In 1868 Edison became an independent inventor in Boston. Edison soon acquired a reputation as a first-rank inventor. In 1871, Edison married 16-year-old Mary Stilwell, whom he had met two months earlier. She was an employee at one of his shops. They had three children.  While working on the telephone in the summer of 1877, Edison discovered a method of recording sound, and in the late fall he unveiled the phonograph. Finally, beginning in the fall of 1878, Edison devoted thirty months to developing a complete system of incandescent electric lighting.

In 1886, at the age of thirty-nine, Edison married the 20-year-old Mina Miller. They also had three children together. By the time of his death on October 18, 1931, Edison had received 1,093 U.S. patents, a total still untouched by any other inventor. Even more important, he created a model for modern industrial research.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo by Mathias Jensen on Unsplash